Senate passes Cotton’s amendment preventing federal funds from promoting CRT in school

The U.S. Senate on Tuesday voted to pass Sen. Tom Cotton’s amendment in the budget reconciliation package that prohibits federal funds to be used to promote critical race theory in schools.

Christopher Rufo, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute who has been critical of CRT, posted that the Senate approved the amendment in a 50-49 vote.

“The fight against CRT has gone national—and Sen. Cotton is leading the way,” he posted.

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Critical race theory has been the center of debate in D.C. and local school districts. It is seen as a way of considering America’s history through the lens of racism.

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“Scholars developed it during the 1970s and 1980s in response to what they viewed as a lack of racial progress following the civil rights legislation of the 1960s,” the Associated Press reported. “It centers on the idea that racism is systemic in the nation’s institutions and that they function to maintain the dominance of white people in society.”

Cotton, R-Ark., posted a video of himself addressing the chamber. He said that he was raised to believe that the U.S. is a great nation. He called CRT an “un-American ideology.”

“They want to teach our children that America is not a good nation, but a racist nation,” he said. “Those teachings are wrong, and our tax dollars should not support them.”

Cotton introduced the Stop CRT Act in July 2021 to prevent the funding from being used inside K-12 classes to teach the theory.

The budget resolution Monday envisioning a massive $3.5 trillion, 10-year cascade of federal resources, aiming historic sums at family support, health and education programs, and an aggressive drive to help the climate.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.


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